2.5.13 Privacy Under Threat with Rise of ‘Public Papping’

2.5.13 Privacy Under Threat with Rise of ‘Public Papping’

Prepare to see distressing and embarrassing images of yourself online with new research revealing an alarming number of men believe it is acceptable to upload shots of intimate moments, accidents, childbirth, fights, strangers on the street and even funerals online.

The Newspoll online survey of more than 1200 Australians aged 18 to 64 found more than one in ten Aussie blokes think it is fine to share a picture during an intimate moment with a partner or while a woman is giving birth. Almost two in ten men think it is ok to post an image from a funeral and around a quarter believe it is appropriate to upload a fight or accident scene where people are hurt.

The results, revealed in the latest round of survey series Crossman Insights by Sydney-based public relations consultancy Crossman Communications, show men are also more likely to think it is all right to upload an image of a stranger who is unaware their picture has been taken, with two in ten saying this practice is acceptable.

Managing Director of Crossman Communications, Jackie Crossman, said that the trend towards ‘public papping’ poses a serious threat to personal privacy and highlights the issue of consent when it comes to distribution of a person’s image.

“It would be horrendous to see an image of a family member being hurt posted online or to have a highly personal moment exposed to the world but our poll shows that increasingly, this is seen as acceptable behaviour. It’s time for society to step up to the plate and make it clear that this type of social media sharing is not on,” said Crossman.

Flagrant hypocrisy was also revealed in the poll results when it comes to mobile etiquette at meal times. Three quarters of Australians said it is wrong to use mobile devices when eating with others but the majority are doing it anyway, with eight in ten 18 to 34 year olds, two thirds of 35 to 49 year olds and four in ten 50 to 64 year olds admitting to messaging, texting or emailing.

A third of respondents said they use their mobiles and tablets during meals to find information related to the conversation and around a quarter to settle an argument. A quarter also do it to find out what their friends or family are up to and around one in five to show others on social media who they are with, where they are or to avoid a boring conversation. Worryingly, once one diner starts others follow with almost a quarter saying they join in.

Crossman said the motivations for online sharing are usually based around blatant exhibitionism or escapism but noted that no matter what the underlying reason is, the result is a mobile manners crisis.

 

“We need to remember the value of living in the present. This means making the effort to connect one-on-one and enjoy convivial conversation with friends and family to ensure we don’t lose the art of non-digital generated tete-a-tete  altogether,” she said.

Crossman Insights is a survey series designed to capture the thoughts and mood of heartland Australia in relation to a range of national issues. Previous polls have looked at whether consumers care what country their food comes from, and Australians’ views on advertising and sponsorship by sports betting agencies.

Crossman Insights – Newspoll Key Findings

 

Messaging/Emailing

  • Almost two thirds (64 per cent) of Australian adults message, text or email friends while dining out with others with around one in three (30 per cent) doing it regularly.
  • This rises to eight in ten (81 per cent) amongst those aged 18-34 with two thirds of 35 to 49 year olds  (65 per cent) and four in ten (42 per cent) of 50 to 64 year olds indulging in the practice.
  • Three quarters (73 per cent) of those with children in the household do it compared to 59 per cent of those without.
  • Two thirds (67 per cent) of capital city-dwellers are doing it compared to 60 per cent in regional areas.

Social Media

  • 45 per cent use Facebook, Twitter or another social media site during a meal with others, rising to two thirds (66 per cent) amongst 18 to 34 year olds.
  • Only 17 per cent of 50 to 64 year olds and 45 per cent of 35 to 49 year olds use social media when dining.
  • Half of those living in the main capital cities are on social media during meals with others compared to 37 per cent of those living outside these areas.

Surfing the Net

  • Half Phen375 browse the internet (a third regularly) when dining with others, rising to 69 per cent amongst 18 to 34 year olds. This compares to 56 per cent of 35 to 49 year olds and only a quarter (27 per cent) of 50 to 64 year olds.
  • Men are more likely to browse during dinner than women with 58 per cent claiming to do so compared to 47 per cent of women.
  • City slickers (56 per cent) are more likely to use the internet during meal occasions than those in regional Australia (47 per cent).

Sharing Pictures

  • Four in ten (39 per cent) share pictures of themselves or the people they are with, and a quarter of Australians (26 per cent) upload photos of the meal they are eating.
  • Almost half (43 per cent) of 18 to 34 year olds share images of their dishes, more than any other age group.
  • Only a quarter (24 per cent) of 35 to 49 year olds and 6 per cent of 50 to 64 year olds are snapping and sharing their meals online, and again metro diners are more likely to do it (31 per cent) compared to their regional counterparts (17 per cent).
  • Amongst those sharing pictures of themselves or the people they’re dining with, 18 to 34 year olds are the most gung-ho with 57 per cent doing it compared to only 36 per cent of those aged 35 to 49 and 19 per cent of those aged 50 to 64.
  • More than one in four (43 per cent) of those living in the capital cities claim to do it compared to only 31 per cent of regional Australians.

Getting Info, Showing Off

  • A third (32 per cent) of Australians are using their mobiles and tablets during meals with others to find information related to the conversation, with 27 per cent saying they use it to settle an argument.
  • A quarter (23 per cent) are doing so to find out what their friends or family are up to, or because the people they are with started using their phones or tablets.
  • One in five (20 per cent) use their phone or tablet to show others on social media who they are with, 19 per cent to show others where they are, and 19 per cent to escape a boring mealtime conversation.
  • A further 16 per cent use it to show others on social media what they’re eating and 15 per cent to avoid conversation with the people at the table.
  • Using phones and tablets in these ways is much more prevalent amongst younger Australians and those living in capital cities.
  • Only half (52 per cent) claim to never use their mobile phone or tablet while having a meal with other people in any of these ways.

It’s Unacceptable, But That Doesn’t Stop Us!

  • Three quarters (77 per cent) believe it is unacceptable to use your mobile phone or tablet when dining with others, rising to 82 amongst women.
  • Almost all Australians aged 50 to 64 (93 per cent) think it is wrong, compared to 77 per cent of those aged 35 to 49 and 65 per cent of those aged 18 to 34.
  • Using your phone or tablet when eating with others is more unacceptable outside of the main capital cities (85 per cent) compared to within the buzzing metropolises (73 per cent).

Privacy Under Threat

  • More than a third (37 per cent) of Australians feel it is acceptable to upload or share pictures online immediately after a woman has given birth, 32 per cent on a first date and 23 per cent of a fight or a bullying incident.
  • One in five (21 per cent) think it is OK to upload images at an accident site where people are hurt, 16 per cent during minor surgery under local anaesthetic, and 15 per cent of people in public places who are unaware their photo is being taken.
  • More than one in ten (13 per cent)  believe it is acceptable to share or upload pictures from a funeral, 12 per cent while a woman is giving birth, and 11 per cent during an intimate moment with a partner.
  • Men find uploading images from an accident site where people are hurt, during minor surgery, at a funeral, during an intimate moment with a partner, and while a woman is giving birth more acceptable than women.
  • Men also think it is more acceptable to share images of people in public places who are unaware their photo has been taken, of a fight or a bullying incident.