24.7.12 Australians Set to Devour Olympics Coverage

24.7.12 Australians Set to Devour Olympics Coverage

Pundits’ predictions of Australia tumbling down the Olympic medal tally this year are not going to stop people across the nation from gluing themselves to their television sets to cheer on local heroes and catch as much sporting action from London as possible.

According to a new nationwide Newspoll survey, the vast majority of Australians aged 18 to 64 (86 per cent) plan on soaking up Olympic action on television with a quarter (24 per cent) planning on watching as much as possible, regardless of what sport is on, and a further third (31 per cent) devouring as much as of their favourite sports as they can.

The results, revealed in a survey series, Crossman Insights, initiated by Sydney-based public relations consultancy Crossman Communications, found a quarter will only tune in to the highlights while six per cent will only be flicking to Olympic programming when Australia looks likely to win a medal.

The biggest fans are Queenslanders with 63 per cent planning on watching as much coverage as they can even if it’s only of their favourite sports, compared to the nation’s average of 55 per cent.

Crossman Communications Managing Director, Jackie Crossman, said despite access to instant news on social media, blogs and websites, people still want to back their favourites and watch all the action on television which is good news for Olympic broadcasters.

“Australians love their sport so it’s not completely surprising we will be tuning in to the games as much as possible. With ratings expected to go through the roof during coverage of the five-ring circus, the winners will be Olympic television broadcasters and their advertisers,” she said.

The Newspoll online omnibus of 1200 people aged 18 to 64 suggests people want to see a fair competition with almost all Australians (93 per cent) believing there should be zero tolerance towards Olympic athletes taking performance enhancing drugs, yet most of us suspect it is reasonably common place.

A stunning 87 per cent of those surveyed sense most users don’t get Viagra Online caught, with a quarter (23 per cent) also believing
the majority of Olympians cheat their way through the games by taking performance enhancers to try and bring home
gold.

A third (31 per cent) think doping is only practised by a few and only 10 per cent reckon almost no athletes are using
drugs. Not surprisingly, less than one in 10 Australians support the idea that all Olympic athletes should be allowed to
take performance enhancing drugs to ensure an even playing field.

“Saying yes to drugs and making it legal is certainly not the solution,” Ms Crossman said. “Doping is unnatural,
dangerous and poses many health risks on athletes, which is why most people are against illegal substances in elite
sport.

“Lifting bans on performance enhancers does not make the competition fairer and spoils the spirit of the Olympics.
Australians want to see and admire athletes who are naturally faster, stronger and most-skilled,” Ms Crossman said.

From a list of eight of Australia’s most-loved Olympic legends, 29 per cent of those surveyed voted Ian Thorpe, who
failed to qualify for the games, as our all-time favourite Olympian while 12 per cent think swimming sensation
Stephanie Rice is the one to watch after being voted fourth favourite behind Cathy Freeman (20 per cent) and Dawn
Fraser (18 per cent).

“Stephanie has had a strong swimming career so far with gold medals and world records already under her belt. Should
she have a successful London games, her standing is likely to jump strongly. This is her big chance to win hearts and
reap the rewards of even more lucrative endorsements,” Ms Crossman said.

Crossman Insights is a survey series designed to capture the thoughts and mood of heartland Australia in relation to a
range of national issues. Previous polls have looked at Australians’ views on retail service and online shopping, whether
we care where our food comes from as long as it is good quality and cheap and opinions on advertising and sponsorship
by sports betting agencies.